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It’s a debate that’Nike Air Vapormax 2017 Colourways UK s raged on for seasons…are you allowed to wear the shirt of an artist that you don’t listen to? We officially declared this trend as being dead in the water last year, but that doesn’t mean it’s any less of a problem, or that you won’t still find a gaggle of teenagers repping vintage wear of bands they can barely pronounce. And compared to other genres, the stakes are considerably higher when we’re talking about metal, a genre that’s often defined by its underground territorialism and adamant refusal to blend with the mainstream. In fashion’s constant quest to uncover the edgiest looks, metal bands have been swept up into the conundrum, with their shirts proudly worn by a new generation who might not have ever listened to their music. Is this for aesthetic purposes, or simply a case of nostalgic irony? Whatever the case, metalheads across the world have roared with disapproval, especially as the trend reaches more niche avenues of the genre. Here, we’ve examined the most common bands who have been subject to the wave of metal shirts that swept through fashion circles like a maelstrom. For all guilty parties, have a read below, and feel somewhat prepared the next time some long-haired yahoo in a bourbon-soaked denim vest starts a conversation with you about your shirt. Hopefully you don’t just freeze and throw up a half-hearted ‘horns up’ gesture, and escape with your dignity in tact. Guns N’ Roses Guns N’ Roses entered themselves into sleazy rock immortality with their debut album Appetite For Destruction, which earned itself permanent rotation at dive bars and strip clubs across the globe. Omnipresent singles like “Welcome To The Jungle” and “Paradise City” were catchy enough to convince countless fans that wearing leopard print headbands was a good idea, while their shirts have been stocked at almost every fast fashion giant in recent years. Later in their career, tumultuous relationships between members led the band to split: Some formed a new group in Velvet Revolver, while Axl Rose soldiered on and released the album Chinese Democracy after one of the longest and most arduous waits in the history of music. With Guns N’ Roses having recently reformed and embarking on a world tour, we’re assuming that everyone with one of their shirts will be attending the shows, right? Slipknot At the turn of the millennium, nu-metal was the definitive soundtrack for teenagers with a middle-fingers-up mentality swimming in a pool of self-pity and XXL jeans, obviously with wallet chains attached. It was a blanket term that referred to everything from the mind-numbing jock anthems of Limp Bizkit to the dreadlocked angst of KoRn, and nu metal bands sometimes employed an under-utilized DJ who added a few scratches to the outro of each track for some ‘urban’ flavour. Slipknot were also lumped into the movement, with nine members wearing Halloween masks and bright jumpsuits. They also have a song called “People = Shit” which makes their outlook on humanity quite clear. While Slipknot shirts have well and truly taken off, we’re patiently waiting for the return of nu-metal’s most iconic style accessory: Fred Durst’s red cap. Metallica Kanye West arguably kickstarted the latest (and let’s hope last) wave of this trend when he appropriated Metallica’s logo for his own Yeezus line, which might be why Kim Kardashian has also been spotted wearing a vintage shirt from the thrash legends. Garments bearing the band’s cover art for Master of Puppets and Ride the Lightning have become much more commonplace, and thankfully, these two most popular shirt designs correlate with their two best albums. After solidifying themselves as pioneers of thrash, Metallica later lost some of their aura when they cut their hair in 1996 and released some semi-baked albums, which makes us believe that Samson-esque powers are very real. Drummer Lars Ulrich was also embroiled in a court case with Napster, and then spearheaded a very weird snare drum sound on Metallica’s 2003 album St Anger. But a whole new era (and surely a whole new line of shirts) are in store thanks to their budding friendship with Lady Gaga. Darkthrone rose to prominence in Norway’s infamous black metal scene and developed a sound that prided itself on primal screams, breakneck blast beats and distorted production that made their songs sound like they were recorded in a cardboard box. The Norwegians’ preference for sprawling, illegible band logos is an aesthetic which has been heavily replicated by brands from Vetements to Pseushi, while Darkthrone shirts at large have also been reinterpreted by new age fashionistas. However, it seems like not many of them actually researched which black metal bands to put on a shirt… some have dabbled in sketchy right wing politics and church burnings. After all, we’re talking about frostbitten Norway, and these gentlemen had to keep themselves warm somehow! Cradle of Filth Having moved down a slightly less abrasive path than their Norwegian colleagues, Cradle of Filth deliver black metal with symphonic elements and theatrics but haven’t given up on the good old fashioned shock tactics. Since the nineties, they’ve landed a bunch of their fans in hot water with a charming shirt design that had ‘JESUS IS A CUNT’ printed on the back. We should emphasize the caps lock for maximum banter. And on the front? A masturbating nun, so this is sure-fire Sunday brunch attire. Rolling Stone went so far as to label it “the most controversial shirt in rock history,” which led to arrests in Australia and a national ban from New Zealand. Nowadays, Cradle of Filth’s presence can be felt on Vetements’ ever-popular “Total Fucking Darkness” hoodie, which is inspired by the band’s 1992 recording of the same name. Iron Maiden In every fashion blogger’s starter kit is an Iron Maiden shirt with the cover art for Number of the Beast printed on it, or at least Balenciaga’s Egyptofunk sweater that took heavy notes from the British band’s logo. Iron Maiden have been alive and kicking for over 40 years, delivering some of the most memorable sing-a-longs and hooks to ever grace human earholes, while singer Bruce Dickinson is also a qualified pilot who flies the band on international tours. Get you a man who can do both. Their incredible live show has been immortalized on the Rock In Rio album, a spine-tingling recording of their 2001 performance in front of 250,000 screaming fans who were probably very squished and dehydrated. Bonus trivia: Iron Maiden’s official mascot is named Eddie, who graces the band’s live shows, cover art and merchandise with unmistakable ghoulishness. Pantera While Pantera shirts are currently gaining popularity, the Southern metal legends have shared some aesthetic common ground with streetwear trends. Pantera were plastering marijuana leaves over their merchandise before every man and his dog wore HUF’s ‘Plantlife’ socks, and they also used the Confederate flag heavily – but perhaps with a little less irony than Kanye West’s controversial Yeezus jackets. It’s fitting that Pantera’s album art for Vulgar Display of Power features a man getting punched in the face, because that’s what their music feels like: thrash-influenced adrenaline anthems with plenty of groove and an almost painful amount of heaviness. Even their ballads like “This Love” and “Cemetery Gates” are hard enough to make you want to headbutt a wall. Slayer redefined thrash metal with their unbelievably heavy album Reign In Blood, a 29-minute slab of wailing solos and relentless riffs produced by Rick Rubin. They have also performed live shows where it’s ‘raining blood’ from the ceiling, which is probably the only adequate way to listen to this demonic masterpiece. You should also be shirtless and intoxicated. Perhaps it was their collaborations with Vans and Supreme that made Slayer merchandise so popular in streetwear, but the most infamous crossover occurred when Kendall Jenner was photographed wearing one of their shirts in 2014. Slayer guitarist Gary Holt responded by performing onstage in a tee that read ‘Kill the Kardashians.’ But how do we know that Kendall isn’t a Slayer fan who listens to the opening riffs of ‘Seasons In the Abyss’ in her bedroom, right after she says goodnight to Tyga and Kylie? It’s possible. If you haven’t already, take a look at why we remain convinced that this metal band T-shirt trend must certainly be on its way out right here. Text: Christopher Kevin Au Cover Image: Kevin Winter / Getty Images

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While winter may still have a few ending remarks before making way for spring, it looks like its already time to check out some sunwear for the New Year. The socially-conscious eyewear specialists at Warby Parker look to freshen things up with the “Sun Collective” collection of frames. The first half of the collections takes three of the brand’s classic silhouettes and adds new lens shapes. These frames will fit just the same as the originals, but the lines have a reshaped interior contour to make way for more graphic proportions.Nike Lebron Low Cheap Nike Lebron Low For Sale UK Crystal inserts characterize the second half of the “Sun Collective”. Three more of Warby’s popular frames are also fashioned with new color combinations and feature crystal embeds along the bottom rim. As always, for every pair sold, a pair is distributed to someone in need. You can shop the collection in-store and online. Words by George Ocampo for Selectism   

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Collaborations have been all the rage for quite some time now. So much so, in fact, that the number of collaborators attached to a single project seems to be increasing by the season; look no further than Gosha Rubchinskiy, N.Air Max 1 Ultra Flyknit Hoolywood and Vetements, who’ve included five, six even 18 brand partnerships in their recent collections. But footwear collaborations don’t seem to produce all that often, so it’s usually pretty interesting when they do. Remember when Jordan and Converse teamed up back in 2012? Or in 2014, when Nike SB and Jordan dropped their very first Air Jordan 1 together? Adding to the roster of sneaker pair-ups is German sportswear giant PUMA and independent Dutch footwear label Filling Pieces, who’ve joined forces for a unique take on PUMA’s ever popular Blaze of Glory silhouette. Ahead of the shoe’s release, I sat down with Filling Pieces’ Creative Director/Founder, Guillaume Philibert, and PUMA’s Global Senior Head of Lifestyle, Yassine Saidi, to find out more about how the collaboration came about, how the two brands merged their respective aesthetics into the new silhouette and more. So, tell me how this collaboration first came about? Guillaume Philibert: PUMA has always been a very big part of my childhood. I always loved PUMA products, because back in the day, there was always a link to sports – all these athletes, it was quite diverse when it came to athletics. The experience I had buying and wearing PUMA footwear actually helped me design my own products at Filling Pieces. Through a mutual friend, Ronnie Fieg, I got in touch with Yassine [Saidi, Global Senior Head of Lifestyle at PUMA], and we got along very well. Then all of a sudden there was a conversation about how we, as two footwear brands, could work together on a project. We sat down and looked at the strengths of the companies; Filling Pieces is a very small, independent, up-and-coming footwear label, and of course PUMA is one of the world’s biggest athletic companies. It was interesting because if you approach [this project] like you would from a smaller label, you have all this craftsmanship, all these materials from Italy and a more luxury approach to footwear, whereas we can’t make athletic footwear because we don’t have resources or factories, unlike PUMA. I think for PUMA, it was interesting to work with a brand like Filling Pieces because you have this craftsmanship and taste for luxury leathers and luxury footwear. Where the market is going now, high-end is coming closer to streetwear, and of course there’s a difference in price and brand awareness, but it’s getting very close. If you look at Givenchy, Kenzo and Balmain, you see that the ready-to-wear stuff is very much inspired by streetwear and vice versa. So those two markets are coming very close together and for us at Filling Pieces, we try to bridge that gap with our product and that was a very interesting space for us to work in. How did you choose the silhouette? G: We actually got together and worked on the Blaze of Glory, which is quite a well known PUMA silhouette. The name of the concept was “Deconstruct to Rebuild,” so we actually looked at the shoe and completely took it apart. We mixed and matched different fabrics that we’ve used in the past and are very known to the Filling Pieces clientele and applied them to the collaborated shoe. How hands on are you with the whole design process? G: I started the company in 2009, and I used to do everything – from marketing and finance to design and logistics. When the company got bigger, I had certain people taking care of those kind of projects and sides of the company. Now I’m just fully focused on creative direction. So I’m the Creative Director of Filling Pieces and involved in marketing as well, but in terms of design, me and my design team work very closely together. How did you compromise in regards to preserving both Filling Pieces’ and PUMA’s aesthetic? G: If you look at the shoe, the colorway is quite simple. It’s black and white, but there’s a lot of detailing on it. If you look at the Blaze of Glory, it’s a little bit bulky in the front, which is just the design. But we at Filling Pieces always have more slick toe boxes, so we took some layers off and changed some lines in the front to add a more luxury feel to the shoe. For example, the toe box is completely laser-woven leather, then there’s the elastic strap which gives off this athletic look. If you look at the lateral side of the shoe, you see the foam and the padding, and that’s what we always have in the shoe in the heel part. With using all of these different fabrics, we felt that we could push for a more luxurious approach to the Blaze of Glory. And of course, there’s the tongue, which is a trademark feature for all Filling Pieces shoes – that was actually both the biggest change and challenge. How has this collaboration been different from previous PUMA partnerships? Yassine Saidi: Every collaboration is different because every relationship is different and everybody works in a different way. What makes this one different is we created a completely new product bearing the PUMA and Filling Pieces DNA’s, that’s the main difference. What are both the strengths and difficulties of working with such an independent brand? Y: There have been no difficulties really as it has been a really organic process. Though they [Filling Pieces] are independent, they know a lot about footwear, they know what they can do and what they can’t do. I just made sure both brands were represented well. Filling Pieces has had a pretty big year, and the brand just seems to be getting bigger. So looking back on where the brand started to where it is now, is it all a bit surreal? G: It’s super surreal. Unfortunately, because we’re in this super fast lane, I appreciate and respect everybody that has helped out and I love where we are right now as a brand, but you don’t realize how fast everything went, and how happy you should be. But sometimes, when I’m on vacation or when I take some time off, I suddenly realize how happy and how grateful you need to be for your success. It doesn’t happen a lot. The whole concept of independency stands for the moment, and the era, that we as Filling Pieces are in right now. When we start designing the collection we feel really independent, we’re at a certain size now where we can do our own sourcing, our own fine-tuning, we’re not depending on leather or any other fabric suppliers anymore and we can do what we want, and we feel a sort of creativity and freedom there and that’s why the FW16 collection stands for independency. Like I said before, the biggest difference between PUMA and Filling Pieces is that PUMA is such a big company, and Filling Pieces because we’re smaller, we’re more flexible in terms of size and strategy. Working with PUMA, we felt there were more restrictions on doing the production ourselves because PUMA is such a big company and they need to work with licensed suppliers and certain factories, so there were boundaries which let us be, in some ways, more creative. When you have all the freedom, it’s easier to design a product than when you have restrictions, and these restrictions really helped us design the shoe and put it together. Y: I think what’s important is the timing, because when we talked about working together, that was almost two years ago. We met in London, and Filling Pieces’ brand was not at the level where it is today. The timing and the alignment, with respect to each other’s brand DNA, we just thought that we could make it – and it really wasn’t a huge risk for us. Filling Pieces is more than an up-and-coming brand, it’s established now. The timing was right for this project, because it happens to bring a different feel to our aesthetic; it talks to a different consumer, talks to different press, brings the brand, through Filling Pieces, to a different level. That’s the whole objective of the exercise, and we’re excited and we hope to work on something else soon. The PUMA x Filling Pieces Blaze of Glory is currently available on Filling Pieces online shop and will be released at select retailers including Dover Street Market London, colette, KITH, Isetan, Luisa Via Roma, Très Bien, SSENSE and Sneakerboy from July 30. Photography: Thomas Welch / Highsnobiety